Posts Tagged ‘underwater’


Oct06

Harvard’s tiny drones can fly & swim

2015 at 11:53 am by admin | Comments Off

ArticleRoboBee

Scientists and engineers at Harvard University have developed a miniature 100mg drone that is both able to fly as well as swim! The drone, known as the RoboBee, lives up to its name by emulating the flight pattern and wing construction of everyday bees, beating its tiny wings at a rate of 120 Hz in order to achieve flight. However, unlike their natural relatives, the RoboBee is also able to use its wings swim and tread water, allowing it to function in both the air and underwater. The drone is even able to easily transition from flying to swimming, and vice versa! Harvard scientists hope to make the RoboBees truly autonomous, and may one day be used in off-shore activities.

Jan13

4-finned underwater robot debuts at TechFest

2015 at 04:47 pm by admin | Comments Off

ArticleSepios

Designers and researchers at the Sepios Team, a Switzerland-based robotics team, have unveiled the latest look at their revolutionary underwater robot at Bombay’s TechFest 2015 earlier this month, showing off the robot’s capabilities and benefits to the environment. The machine, titled the Sepios, is based on a four-finned propulsion system influenced from cuttlefish, and uses revolutionary technology in order to take advantage of all four fins underwater. As opposed to traditional propeller-based transportation on underwater vessels and machines, which can tangle on plant life and disturb wildlife, Sepios’ fin-based propulsion is completely silent, and allows the machine to glide effortlessly through open waters and seaweed forests alike. On top of that, the four fins allow for unhindered movement in all directions, letting the robot ascend or descend, turn, and stop on a dime. The Sepios Team hopes to continue to improve the robot by improving its coordination, on-board camera, and other detectors before it is used for any practical purposes, but the Sepios shows a promising future in alternative underwater propulsion.