Posts Tagged ‘print’


Jun25

World’s first 3D-printed supercar

2015 at 10:51 am by admin | Comments Off

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Divergent Microfactories has revealed their first stab into the 3D-printed automobile market with their new supercar, the Blade! The vehicle was revealed earlier this week at the O’Reilly Solid Conference in San Francisco, California, where investors, manufacturers, and entrepreneurs gather to invent and display new hardware and software innovations in a variety of fields. The Blade itself is created from 3D-printed aluminum nodes in a variety of sizes and shapes that can be connected by simple carbon fiber tubing, which is then quickly assembled and fitted with the chassis. 70 nodes are involved in construction, and the process takes only 30 minutes to complete. This makes the Blade one of the most environmentally friendly 3D-printed cars to date, creating 1/50th the factory emissions and costs of other cars.

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The Blade is no slouch on the roadway either. Billed as the world’s first 3D-printed supercar, it is capable of going from 0 to 60 mph in 2.2 seconds, thanks to its 700-horsepower internal combustion engine that can run on either standard gasoline or compressed natural gas. The car is also safe and durable, weighing 90% lighter than other cars while maintaining a stronger, more durable frame. Divergent Microfactories plans to release the tools and tech used in the creation of the Blade to the open market, and hopes that independent factories and entrepreneurs alike will take advantage of their work to create their own car designs. While there is no news on whether the Blade will hit retail or the future of Divergent Microfactories, their work with this supercar is a good sign of the future of 3D printing in the car industry.

May15

“Cubes” turns food into isometric art

2015 at 12:43 pm by admin | Comments Off

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Design studio Lernert & Sander have taken food to the next level with their photo project titled “Cubes”. The project was commissioned by Dutch newspaper “de Volkskrant” in 2014 for a food-themed documentary, and Lernert & Sander stepped up to plate with a giant print of 98 different food cubes. Each identical 1″ cube is cut from a different food product, and the materials range from vegetables, fruits, meat, and even mushrooms! All of the food was freshly cut before their photo session, keeping the products looking clean and tasty. The food was cut using a unique slicer over the course of the five-day photo shoot session, and come together into one isometric presentation. Lernert & Sander are currently selling prints of the finished piece through their website, so fans of the clean design aesthetic and delicious food can have one of their very own!

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Apr20

Artist creates 3D printed film

2015 at 12:14 pm by admin | Comments Off

Article3DPrintMovie

As a testament to the use of 3D printing in the creative process, artist and filmmaker Gilles-Alexandre Deschaud has uploaded a trailer for his fully 3D-printed film! The film, titled “Chase Me”, is a solo project by Deschaud, whom has spent the past two years putting together every aspect of the film. Every frame of animation is its own printed figure, and even the sets and backgrounds used in the film have been created through the printer. Deschaud has uploaded two videos of the movie, featuring a short trailer as well as a making-of video which shows the creative process behind the film. While the film is still under development, these videos give viewers a good look at what to expect, as well as what can be done with 3D printing in animation.



Jan14

3D printed car at 2015 NA Auto Show

2015 at 04:42 pm by admin | Comments Off

Article3DCarJan

Oak Ridge National Laboratory has collaborated with a number of companies in 3D-printed automobile venture, most recently with Local Motors and their 3D-printed car at the International Manufacturing Technology Show last September. Now, designers at ORNL has debuted their newest 3D-printed vehicle at the 2015 North American International Auto Show, located in Detroit. Here, ORNL is showing off their new 3D-printed replica of the vintage 1965 Shelby Cobra sports car, sporting a glossy paint job and a number of unique features. While the car looks like a classic Shelby Cobra on the outside, the vehicle is actually made of over 500 pounds of 3D-printed parts, including shell, frame, grill, and even headrests! The printed material is made of a carbon fiber filament mixture, allowing for a sturdy yet lightweight build. The car itself took only 24 hours to print, a step up from their 44-hour long print at the September IMTS, and is a step towards speeding up the creation and testing of car prototypes from drawing and clay concept models. While the world is still a long way from printing out our own cars from the comfort of our home, ORNL’s Shelby is a proof of concept, facilitating the testing and creation of new vehicles.

Nov10

Robots designed to 3D print moon bases

2014 at 01:41 pm by admin | Comments Off

ArticleMoonBase

Space exploration and colonization of moons and planets have been ideas that, while dreamed about by billions of people across the world for generations, have been nothing but the work of science-fiction and fantasy. However, the European Space Agency hopes to change that in the near future, thanks to revolutionary new technology and innovations within the field of 3D printing. The ESA has detailed plans for a self-sustaining moon base, made almost entirely from components and materials found on the moon’s surface, which will be able to house several astronauts and necessary utilities. What makes the ESA-designed moonbase different from past concepts is its use of the moon itself in protecting exposed astronauts.



While Earth has an outer atmosphere that protects its surface and inhabitants from extreme temperatures, solar radiation, and meteorites, the Moon offers no such shelter. In order to safely house astronauts and recreate the life-saving benefits of the atmosphere, a robot designed to sculpt the environment will create a protective shell around the initial infrastructure. This shell is made from a mixture of lunar dust scavenged by the robot as well as multiple layers of 3D-printed webbing. This shell would provide all the benefits offered by Earth’s atmosphere, and would also allow for other bases to be connected to one another to create a multi-room base on the moon. These plans have been in the works since 2013, and while the ESA states that these concepts are still being worked on and fine-tuned, these structures could begin popping up on the moon within 40 years.

Oct24

Purikura at TOMODACHI

2014 at 11:31 am by admin | Comments Off

ArticlePurikura1

Take fun photos with friends and family with the new Purikura photo machines at TOMODACHI! Purikura is a Japanese photo booth machine which originally debuted in July 1995. Created by video game and arcade companies Atlus and SEGA, the machines have since become a huge hit across the world, and several varieties of these booths have appeared over the past two decades.

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What is Purikura? Purikura, or プリクラ, is short for プリント倶楽部, or Print Club. Purikura was originally synonymous with specific machines, but now stands for the photo booth phenomenon in Japan as a whole, covering all different manner of photo booth machines and experiences. Each machine features different specific features and technology, ranging from editing hair and eye color to even allowing users to alter the size of their facial features to achieve an anime-esque look. These machines have become a popular icon of Japanese culture, and have started to spread to different nations all over the world.

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Operating the Purikura booths is a fun and intuitive experience, allowing groups of people to quickly snap their photos and edit them to their liking. To use a Purikura booth, which are designed for customers of all ages to enjoy, customers will first decide on a theme for their photo session. These themes each provide a different set of colored backgrounds and sticker for users, so choose your favorite!

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Once this is done, users will choose the brightness level of their photos, and start snapping! There are a wide variety of colored and themed backgrounds to choose from, and there are even overlays than be used to create fun photos and unique posing opportunities.

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After taking their photos, the booth will move these photos to the machine’s touchscreen tablets, where the photos can be enhanced with stamps, stickers, glitter, frames, and even hand-drawn messages and characters. Once completed, the machine prints out the edited photos onto glossy sticker paper, which can be cut up and used as framed photos, stickers for your favorite notebook or wallet, or whatever else you can imagine!

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TOMODACHI has a Purikura booth set up at our Rosedale Shopping Center location, and will have a new Purikura booth at our Mall of America store by Friday, October 24th as well! Make sure to stop by, alone or with friends, and give these fun booths a spin!

Oct13

First 3D-printed rocket set to liftoff

2014 at 12:46 pm by admin | Comments Off

Article3DRocket1

Researchers and designers at the Special Projects Bureau of The Register, a British technology magazine, have announced their plans to launch a 3D-printed rocket into outer space later this year! The rocket, which was recently completed by the team of 30 designers after four years of testing, cost over $9500 to construct, and will feature an outer frame made entirely of 3D-printed material, similar to the metal parts that NASA is using in its own 3D-printed rocket parts. The rocket was even modified to use a standard hobby rocket motor at extremely high altitudes. The team will launch the freshly completed rocket later this year from Spaceport America in New Mexico, where the rocket will be lifted to 65,600 feet by a helium balloon. There, the rocket will ignite and launch into space, where it will then use on-board cameras and autopilot to return safely to the surface.

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Sep11

World’s first 3D car printed and assembled live

2014 at 11:16 am by admin | Comments Off

Article3DCar

The biannual International Manufacturing Technology Show, which takes place at the McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois, often focuses on the future of technology in the manufacuting workplace, including automobiles, medical facilities, green tech, and more. Automobile company Local Motors is set to tread new ground at this year’s IMTS, which will take place from September 8th to the 13th, by showcasing one of the newest and fastest growing technologies in the industry: a live printing and assembling of the world’s first 3D car!

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The car, known as the Strati, will be printed over the course of 44 hours throughout the event, and will be assembled and driven on Saturday, September 13th. While the printed car will still have to use conventional non-printable parts such as the battery, motor, and suspension, the completed Strati vehicle will use only 40 parts throughout its chassis. This unprecedented event will be the first time a 3D car is printed and driven, and serves to showcase the possibilities of 3D-printed vehicles in the future. Local Motors also plans to release the plans for the Strati’s 3D printed components for purchase in the near future.

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